SuperPAC silliness

Tuesday, March 13, 2012   |   Posted by Jim Hightower
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SuperPACs, the new money beasts of American politics, have already funneled more than $100 million into this year's presidential election.

The über-wealthy are allowed to dump unlimited sums of cash into whichever of these beasts is backing their favored candidate. It's okay, declared the Supreme Court, because each superPAC operates entirely separately from candidates themselves. Indeed, the Court banned any coordination between the candidate's campaign and the electioneering of the PAC.

To see how splendidly this is working, visit Suite 555 in an Alexandria, Virginia, office building. You'll find Target Point Consulting there, headed by Alexander Gage, a top staffer in Mitt Romney's 2008 presidential run. This year, Target Point is consulting with the Romney campaign – but it's also consulting with Romney's superPAC. Gage admits that this might look "ridiculous," but he promises that Target Point staff working for Romney are kept separate from those working for Romney's PAC.

Uh-huh, but, what about WWP Strategies, headed by Romney's deputy campaign manager, Katie Gage? Yes, she's married to Alexander, and her firm also is located in Suite 555. Cozy huh?

Then there's Black Rock Group, headed by Carl Forti, who was Romney's 2008 political director. Now, though, Carl is senior strategist for Romney's superPAC. Guess where Forti's Black Rock Group is headquartered? Right – Suite 555.

Mr. Gage explains that while his firm and Ms. Gage's firm are in the same suite, the two principals do not discuss Romney's campaign or PAC with each other. And he points out that while Target Point and Black Rock also share the space, the two firms are separated by a conference room. "It's not like we're a commingled office," he assures us.

There's a word for this: silly. Also, fraud. And,
corrupt.

"Fine Line Between 'SuperPACs' and Campaigns," The New York Times, February 26, 2012

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